Yearly Archives: 2000

Having a rare disease like pemphigus or pemphigoid can make you feel like you have lost control of your life. After being diagnosed you may experience fear, confusion, and you may feel unclear about your future. You may even feel helpless, vulnerable, and at the mercy of others. Your self- esteem may be compromised along with your immune system. The anxiety or stress that can bring may be overwhelming. The good news is that these feelings are normal and more importantly that you truly do have the power to stay in control!

Here are a few tips on how to keep calm and stay in control:

1.      Offer help to others – this will help you keep your disease in perspective

2.      Find the “silver-lining,” in every situation – there is always something positive to gain

3.      Respect and accept that you can’t control everything – the sooner you realize this, the better!

4.      Don’t be a victim, be a contender!

5.      Be proud of yourself – every day is a step in the right direction

6.      Learn about your disease – knowledge is power

7.      Be self-determined – you are the master of your fate

8.      Speak up for yourself – being heard builds affirmation

9.      Consider how your disease will help you grow as an individual

10.  Don’t be afraid to ask for help and support!

You are not in this alone and there are many patients that are experiencing the struggles that you are going through. If you reach out to others through the IPPF you will find that you really are in control and together with other patients like you we have the power to overcome this disease.

Not sure how to connect with others?  Just “Ask a Coach!” Remember, when you need us, we are in your corner!

Living with a bullous skin disease is a challenge in more ways than one.  In addition to taking medication we also need to be taking supplements, avoid certain foods and spices, take caution in how we move and bathe, and relax to reduce stress.

We also need to take extra precautions against the sun’s harmful rays…more so than the average person who does not have pemphigus or pemphigoid.

It isn’t always a sunny day that can bring the harmful rays.  Cloudy days can be deceiving – you can get your worst sunburns through the clouds.  Reflections from the water in swimming pools, lakes, oceans, etc. increase the harmful effects of the sun’s rays as well as the reflections from the snow when skiing.

Women also need to make sure that their foundation has an SPF ingredient – this was told to me by the national makeup advisor for Dior.  I never knew this!  But it does help…even if we don’t actively stay out in the sun and are just running around doing errands.

According to the American Academy of Dermatology:

“Dermatologists recommend using a sunscreen with an SPF block of at least 30, which blocks 97% of the sun’s rays.  Just make sure it offers a broad-spectrum (UVA and UVB) protection, an SPF of 30 or greater, and is water resistant.”

Before trying to figure out which brand is the best to buy, discuss with your dermatologist. He/she can make suggestions for you based on your skin’s level of activity.

Don’t forget your ears, too!  Ear lobes are very sensitive and need protection. For those of you with scalp involvement, it is best to consult with your dermatologist who will recommend what sunscreen products are best for the scalp.  Hats are advisable when venturing outside.  Solid hats…not straw as the sun’s rays will stream through the weaves and cause damage!  Take extra care with the “driver’s arm” — you know, your arm that is exposed to the sun when you’re driving?  The sun’s rays are intensified through the glass windows. Best to be sure you are either wearing long sleeves or extra sunscreen.  If you are going in the water, sunscreen needs to be reapplied often.

UV radiation also impairs the skin’s immune system in alarming ways. Sun exposure reduces the number of watchdog cells that help recognize and respond to antigens, and alters their function so they are as effective as dozing prison guards. “This effect on immune suppression can set in even before a sunburn,” Dr. Baron said. Reference: http://www.nytimes.com/2009/05/14/fashion/14SKIN.html?pagewanted=all&_r=0

Remember, when you need us we are always in your corner!

More people have climbed Mount Everest than have crossed the United States of America on foot. Noah Coughlan has just finished with his amazing third run across america. Noah started a coast-to-coast run February 28, 2015 in New York City, NY. He finished after 127 days, crossing 13 states, and running 3,000 miles. He was greeted by his family, friends, and hundreds of patients with rare diseases, as he ran into the water at Ocean Beach, California on the 4th of July 2015.

Finale Finish Line Flag Done

Noah had been running to rally support for the 30 million Americans affected by rare diseases. There are over 7,000 known rare diseases – affecting 1 out of every 10 Americans. Noah’s inspiration to run comes from his personal connection to two childhood friends battling a rare brain disease called Batten Disease. Noah’s efforts demonstrated that just one person can truly make a difference. During his “Run4Rare” he was interviewed by many media outlets, met with lawmakers, engaged patients and families, and rallied support for the scientists and researchers attempting to find cures for rare diseases.

Throughout his journey Noah dedicated his daily miles to a different child or adult battling a different rare disease. On May 29, 2016 he dedicated his run to Marc Yale and the entire pemphigus and pemphigoid community. He ran an average of 25 miles per day battling adverse weather conditions and physical exhaustion. Noah ran solo while pushing an 80 pound jogging stroller of supplies. Above his stroller waved a large American flag given to him by the United States Air Force. The American flag Noah ran with every day was officially retired in a moving ceremony at Ocean Beach, CA when he arrived on Independence Day.

Noah’s unwavering dedication to be the voice for the rare disease community by running across the U.S. three times was inspiring to many advocates. One patient stated at a reception, sponsored by the National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD), following the transcontinental run, “that he created a bridge for all rare disease groups to work together.” The impact that Noah delivered during his “Run4Rare” was to show that every person matters. Noah’s message of hope for patients with rare diseases has reached the halls of congress and every community he passed through on his journey.  His passion and tenacity as an advocate should remind us all that we need to advocate for ourselves as well as the entire rare disease community.

Noah and Marc Hannah and Noah Marc, Woman, and Noah Noah

Studies have shown that there is a mind-body connection.  It is known that stress can cause headaches, muscle aches, tummy aches, and blisters!   For those affected by pemphigus and pemphigoid (P/P), when your stress levels are high, the antibodies know when it is time to come out and play.  Horrors!  It is easier said than done to remain calm and stress-free.

Have you experienced when you have a headache and you worry more about something and the headache gets worse?  That is an example of the mind-body connection.

The brain signals the immune system, and we never know until after it happens.  In order to ward off these signals, it is important for patients to remain even-minded.  HA!  You say!  You’re right!  However, there are ways for us to get better at this.  It just takes practice.

Meditation can be very helpful.  Even if only for 5 minutes at a time.  Never feel that you must sit in a lotus position and keep stiff for an hour!  That is not what meditation is about!

There are a lot of meditation videos on YouTube that you could take a look at.  Just type in the word “Meditation” and a lot of suggestions come up!

Breathing exercises are a great way to help keep your blood pressure down. They help to bring a sense of calmness to envelope you.  Essentially, you are inhaling slowly to a count of 10 or 20 and holding the breath for 10 or 20 and then exhaling slowly for 10 or 20.  When you exhale, think of a happy word (like an affirmation) ie: joy or peace.

Deciding whether you should continue working or go on Social Security Disability is a tough decision. It can add to your stress level and worsen your disease activity. Before you rush into any decisions you should take inventory of how you are feeling physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Your job or career can have a significant impact on these aspects of your health. It’s important to understand how your job is affecting you. If you feel like you need to be on disability you should consider the following:

  • Will you be on long-term or short-term disability?
  • How will it affect your recovery and ability to reach remission?
  • How will it affect your insurance coverage and drug costs?
  • How will affect you financially?

Once you have decided, contact your physician and let them know that you need their assistance in the process. Your physician will need to provide information that confirms that your condition is severe and that you can’t do the work you previously did due to your condition. Apply immediately at www.ssa.gov so you can start the process.

Both you and your physician will receive a health questionnaire about your condition. Make sure that you and your doctor list all impairments that prevent you from working including medication side effects. Be aware that an interview may be held to determine your health condition. Keep copies of all your paperwork, health records, and track your conversations. Get to know your case worker as they will have influence in the decision process.

In many cases Social Security Disability claims can be denied the first time. Don’t let this discourage you! You can always file an appeal with additional medical information that can substantiate your claim. The IPPF can also help provide information about the disease that may help educate individuals regarding the severity of the disease.

Bullous Skin Disorders are included under listed impairments and in many cases Quick Disability Determinations (QDD) can be made depending on the severity of your disease. Receiving benefits, like your disease, take time so the sooner you apply the better! Although the process may seem daunting, your health may depend on advocating for yourself.

Don’t be afraid to contact the IPPF if you have a question or just “Ask a Coach”! Remember, when you need us, we’re in your corner!

 

15FORRARE-web-banner

What would you say if you had 15 seconds to advocate for pemphigus and pemphigoid?

Would you tell them about the statistics? Would you talk about the person you know who is struggling with their disease? The sister or brother, friend or co-worker who struggles to find treatments and support? Or would you talk about your own diagnosis and how its existence has changed your world?

Global Genes is proud to launch the #15ForRARE Campaign—a social media video movement highlighting the individual voice in the rare community. Through participation in this campaign, #15ForRARE video activists (YOU!) are entered into a contest to win two sets of tickets to this year’s RARE Patient Advocacy Summit, and Tribute to Champions of Hope Gala. A Prize valued at $1,100. There will be two winners- each able to bring a guest.

Now is your time to speak up and tell the world why you “Care About RARE.” This movement is for patients, advocates, and industry alike. Through our individual voices we will unite and bring attention to a community that so deserves it.

Here’s how you get involved and get entered into our contest:Advocate for Rare

• Film yourself “selfie” style answering the prompt “I care about rare because…”
•Video must be no longer than 15 seconds
• Video must be uploaded to our contest entry form, found here.
• Video must be posted on at least one social media platform (Facebook,Twitter, Instagram, Youtube, Vimeo, Vine) with the hashtag #15ForRARE and#GlobalGenes (Don’t forget to use #healourskin too!)

And that’s it!

Each place you post your entry is an extra entry in the contest. The winner will be selected at random from the pool of applicants. Two winners will get two free entries to Global Genes annual RARE Patient Advocacy Summit and our Tribute to Champions of Hope Gala (airfare and accommodations not included, no cash prize offered). If you have already purchased tickets and win the contest, you will be reimbursed for their cost.

Global Genes will be using the videos submitted to us for cause marketing as well as will feature them at their RARE Patient Advocacy Summit!

My name is Todd Kuh and prior to December of 2010, I was a healthy, active person who had a passion for bicycle racing.  After being diagnosed in December of 2010, I was a Pemphigus patient and no longer an athlete.  My physician informed me shortly after my diagnosis that I would not race again.  He explained that physical and emotional stress must be carefully monitored and controlled from that moment on as stress could trigger the disease.  As I sat in the exam room I heard “Chronic disease”, “no known cure”, “painful”, and “potentially life threatening” and wondered how I would tolerate this new reality. 

On my way from the physician’s office that afternoon to the pharmacy to purchase my bag of medications (trying to figure out what just happened to my life), I decided to take one last bike ride.  As I rode that afternoon, still feeling strong from the countless hours of training, I suddenly realized that I would never feel this way again.

I always believed that I was blessed to be able to ride and race my bike and never took a single ride for granted.  Throughout my medical treatment, I leaned on friends, family and lessons learned from training and racing to provide me with the positive attitude I needed to overcome this disease.  Although I practiced a healthy lifestyle prior to diagnosis, I implemented a revised health and meditation program that would maximize the treatment I received.

After nearly three years of intensive treatment under the careful watch of Dr. Sergei Grando at the University of California, Irvine, School of Medicine, through healthy lifestyle choices and with the incredible support from friends and family, I’m in remission.

Dr. Grando again cautioned me of the factors that could contribute to relapse, which included physical stress.  He assured me that should I choose to return to training and bicycle racing, my remission would most certainly be brief.

I realized that a healthy lifestyle incorporates exercise, which of course would be moderate in my case.  With Dr. Grando’s approval, I began cycling again.  As the months passed and my fitness slowly began to return, I realized that I was capable of doing more than I or Dr. Grando believed I could.  However, I battled with the constant fear that my exercise program would trigger a relapse, which created unnecessary stress.

I connected with the IPPF and spoke with Victoria, a Pemphigus patient who told me about her running and physical activities.  We shared our stories and were surprised and encouraged to learn that we both successfully live moderately active lifestyles while in remission.  We agreed that exercise contributes to a variety of health benefits in addition to our sustained remission.   My conversation with Victoria simply changed my life and gave me confidence that I could live an active lifestyle, which further contributed to my emotional well being.  I’m certainly much slower and I don’t go very far, but I cherish every pedal stroke!

Once I realized that I was capable of a level of physical activity beyond what I previously expected, I began to experience the calming meditative qualities that exercise provides.  Simply, moderate exercise reduces stress.  While this is certainly not news to anyone, it’s critical for Pemphigus patients.

It was at this time that Victoria and I realized that a healthy program integrating sound nutritional choices, active stress reduction and moderate exercise would greatly benefit Pemphigus and Pemphigoid patients

Chasing Down Pemphigus and Pemphigoid is a program intended to provide hope and a new perspective to the patient community, raise funding for critical research studies, awareness and patient support programs while promoting active, healthy lifestyles as a critical part of disease management.

The Chasing Down Pemphigus & Pemphigoid program is an ongoing campaign that challenges every patient to make better nutrition choices, go for a walk each day, take a yoga class, meditate, take on a new hobby or do anything that improves our health, attitude and emotional well being.  Chasing Down Pemphigus & Pemphigoid is about proving that we can do more than what was thought possible.

The IPPF is a small non-profit foundation that provides important patient programming and support.  While Chasing Down Pemphigus & Pemphigoid is first and foremost a year-round program designed to motivate and support patients in their efforts to live healthy and active lifestyles, it is also a critical fund raising campaign that assists the IPPF in continuing to provide all of the support we all greatly appreciate.

Check your mailbox and your email box in the coming months for Chasing Down Pemphigus & Pemphigoid articles on nutrition, stress reduction, exercise, support and patient stories (including YOUR story!).  Can’t wait?  Then email me at: todd@pemphigus.org or Victoria at: Victoria@pemphigus.org to get going.

Dear pemphigus & pemphigoid community,

The House of Representatives is expected to vote on H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act, the week of June 15th. The IPPF is urging our patient community to show its united support for this crucial legislation by contacting your representative today and ask them to co-sponsor H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act.

This bill includes many provisions that could benefit our community and the rare disease community as whole including:

  • Billions in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Hundreds of millions dollars in new funding for the Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
  • The OPEN ACT, which contains incentives that could double the number of rare disease treatments
  • The CURE ACT, that requires companies to publish expanded access policies
  • Patient focused drug development
  • It’s easy. Don’t wait! Go to this link to make your voice heard: http://www.congressweb.com/KAKI/39

For those not familiar with an action alert here are some simple instructions:
1. Click on the link above
2. Fill in your street address & zip code and click “take action”
3. Fill in the rest of your personal information and a personal message (optional) about what 21st Century Cures means to you
4. Review your message and click “send”

For more information on 21st Century Cures you can go to: http://energycommerce.house.gov/cures

For questions or if you are interested in getting involved in advocacy for the pemphigus & pemphigoid community, please contact Marc Yale marc@pemphigus.org

Preparing for your doctor’s appointment can help you get the most from your visit. Taking an active role in your care will make you an empowered patient. In addition, proactively learning about your disease will improve your healthcare and treatment experience. Collecting the information needed before a doctor’s appointment can ensure that you are organized and strengthen your doctor-patient relationship. Here are ten tips on how to prepare for the visit that will assist you in feeling better when you leave the doctor’s office.

1.      Have all your questions answered. Bring a checklist, and be ready to take notes

2.      Schedule enough time & bring your prescriptions

3.      Address priorities first & clarify concerns

4.      Remember to say “Thank You”

5.      Learn what tests are needed before the visit (if any)

6.      Have copies of your medical records

7.      Get a summary of your visit when you leave

8.      Fill out medical release to get your records

9.      Be patient

10.  Be confident and share your knowledge

Sometimes it is valuable to gain a second, third, or even fourth opinion when seeking a treatment for pemphigus and pemphigoid. Additional opinions also provide an opportunity for you to learn more about your condition and it can offer some peace of mind that you are approaching your disease with the best chance for a favorable outcome.

Remember, if you have questions don’t be afraid to “Ask a Coach” because when you need us we are in your corner!

H.R. 6, The 21st Century Cures Act of 2015, continues to gain broad support in the United States House of Representatives. The legislation will; increase the development of research through the National Institutes of Health, improve patient-focused drug development, accelerate the approval process for new medical therapies, provide guidance on Precision Medicine, modernize the clinical trial process, expedite patient access, and streamline data and health information.

The IPPF urges you to email the following Congressional Representatives and thank them for their support in co-sponsoring H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act of 2015:

New Cosponsor: Rep. Jim Costa [D-CA16]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Timothy Walz [D-MN1]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Ben Luján [D-NM3]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Christopher Gibson [R-NY19]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Bill Johnson [R-OH6]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Bill Flores [R-TX17]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Julia Brownley [D-CA26]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Lois Frankel [D-FL22]

New Cospo nsor: Rep. Rodney Davis [R-IL13]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Cheri Bustos [D-IL17]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Joseph Kennedy [D-MA4]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Ann Wagner [R-MO2]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Joaquin Castro [D-TX20]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Barbara Lee [D-CA13]

New Cosponsor: Rep. John Sarbanes [D-MD3]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Robert Latta [R-OH5]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Steve Scalise [R-LA1]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Gregg Harper [R-MS3]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Pete Olson [R-TX22]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Adam Kinzinger [R-IL16]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Mike Pompeo [R-KS4]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Chris Collins [R-NY27]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Mimi Walters [R-CA45]

New Cosponsor: Rep. Rick Allen [R-GA12]

Click on the link to go to your Representatives website and contact them. Please use this sample letter to assist in writing your email.

If you have any questions or would like to be more involved in IPPF advocacy, please contact marc@pemphigus.org