Yearly Archives: 2007

The International Pemphigus & Pemphigoid Foundation (IPPF) and the entire pemphigus and pemphigoid community would like to thank the House Energy and Commerce Committee for its non-partisan approval yesterday of the 21st Century Cures Act by a vote 51-0.

This legislation has important significance to our community as it will help modernize and personalize healthcare, support disease research, encourage innovation, and improve patient access to treatment. The bill, a year-long in the making, was championed by committee Chairman Fred Upton (R-MI) and Representative Diana DeGette (D-CO).

H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act, has been sent to the House or Senate for full consideration. The IPPF urges you to contact your Representatives and ask them to support this legislation.

The Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee (HELP) is currently working on it’s own version of the initiative called America’s Leadership in Medical Innovation for Patients, led by Chairman Lamar Alexander (R-TN). The IPPF will keep you aware of the latest developments as they occur but we also encourage you to reach out to the following Senators to express the urgency in creating legislation that will benefit you and all rare disease patients.

Republicans by Rank
Lamar Alexander (TN)
Michael B. Enzi (WY)
Richard Burr (NC)
Johnny Isakson (GA)
Rand Paul (KY)
Susan Collins (ME)
Lisa Murkowski (AK)
Mark Kirk (IL)
Tim Scott (SC)
Orrin G. Hatch (UT)
Pat Roberts (KS)
Bill Cassidy, M.D. (LA)

Democrats by Rank
Patty Murray (WA)
Barbara A. Mikulski (MD)
Bernard Sanders (I) (VT)
Robert P. Casey, Jr. (PA)
Al Franken (MN)
Michael F. Bennet (CO)
Sheldon Whitehouse (RI)
Tammy Baldwin (WI)
Christopher S. Murphy (CT)
Elizabeth Warren (MA)

For information on 21st Century Cures, go to: http://energycommerce.house.gov/markup/full-committee-vote-21st-century-cures-act

For information on the Senate Health, Education, Labor & Pensions Committee (HELP) go to: http://www.help.senate.gov/

If you would like to get more involved in pemphigus & pemphigoid advocacy, please contact Marc Yale, Peer Health Coach marc@pemphigus.org.

Thank you for your support!

IPPF Awarded Abbey S. Meyer Leadership Award by NORD

Washington, D.C. – IPPF, International Pemphigus & Pemphigoid Foundation, was honored today at the Portraits of Courage gala event as the recipient of the prestigious Abbey S. Meyer Leadership Award by NORD (National Organization for Rare Disorders).

NORD hosts the Portraits of Courage Gala annually to bring together the rare disease community and to honor and celebrate the year’s outstanding achievements.  During the event, they recognize the individuals, organizations, advocates and companies that are moving the community forward in the fight against rare diseases.

The award was presented to the IPPF for the organization’s outstanding advocacy achievements on behalf of patients with rare diseases. The award, named for NORD’s founding president, is presented each year to a NORD Member Organization for demonstrating outstanding leadership and representation of its members.

We are proud to work with NORD and other member organizations to provide a voice for those living with rare diseases. Each year, NORD, a nonprofit organization that represents the 30 million Americans with rare diseases, hosts the Portraits of Courage celebration, to celebrate the pioneering achievements of individuals and organizations.

The IPPF is the pre-eminent global organization dedicated to improving the quality of life of all people diagnosed with, or affected by, pemphigus or pemphigoid.

Having a flare after being in remission can be a scary and frustrating experience. Thoughts run through your head about your previous experiences and you may wonder if your disease will be as bad as it was before. When you have the flare, it is important to recognize it and take the challenge head-on. It’s easy to become stressed from the uncertainty and lack of control, but remember that stressing will only make things worse. Here are some tips to reduce the intensity and time that you may have the flare.

1.      Schedule an appointment with your doctor immediately.

2.      Have your doctor give you a clinical diagnosis or get a biopsy done to confirm the flare. There are many differential diagnoses for your disease so you want to be sure it is what you suspect.

3.      Discuss with your doctor a treatment strategy and begin right away.

4.      Track your disease activity in a log, this will help you determine if you condition is improving.

5.      Follow up with your doctor regularly and advocate for yourself. Seeing your doctor every 4-6 weeks is recommended. If you have an aggressive flare you may need to see your doctor more frequently.

6.      If you need support, contact the IPPF and talk with a Peer Health Coach. Coaches are available to answer questions and help you decide how to best handle your flare.

It is common for flares not to be as intense as your first experience with the disease, but all patients have different experiences. The important thing is to be proactive and stabilize the disease activity as soon as possible. Flares are part of living with pemphigus and pemphigoid but if they are handled quickly and with a positive attitude you can eliminate them sooner.

Remember, if you have questions to “Ask a Coach” because when you need us we are in your corner!

Please call Congress TODAY and ask them to include the OPEN ACT, HR 971 (Orphan Product Extensions Now, Accelerating Cures & Treatments) in the 21st Century Cures Legislation. The OPEN ACT has the potential to double the number of approved rare disease treatments available to patients. To date, 155 patient organizations support the OPEN ACT, including NORD, Global Genes, and the Genetic Alliance. By standing together we can ensure Congress helps rare disease patients.

Click here to take action: Stand up for Rare Disease Patients TODAY

Please share this alert widely and join this event on Facebook.

Why the OPEN ACT is important: Despite advances made possible by the Orphan Drug Act, 95 percent of the 7,000 rare diseases still have no approved treatments. Biopharmaceutical companies are not repurposing major market therapies to treat rare diseases because there is no incentive for them to do so.

The OPEN ACT is bipartisan legislation that creates an economic incentive for companies to repurpose drugs for rare diseases. The OPEN ACT could:
·         Bring hundreds of treatments to rare disease patients
·         Enable access to safe, effective and affordable treatments
·         Spur biotech investment, innovation, and foster clinical research at universities while creating new jobs

Learn more at: http://curetheprocess.org/ incentivize/

 

I recently spoke with a patient who stated that his marriage was under a great deal of strain – which is highly understandable as the significant others of patients are the caregivers and are often in the line of fire, so to speak.

This was not the first time a wife or husband had confided this to me. Helplessness can cause patients and/or their caregivers great despair – to which wanting to run away is an understandable reaction.

Patients experience pain, embarrassment, and uncertainty when afflicted with P/P or other rare diseases.

The caregivers can empathize, the caregivers cannot truly feel what the patients are experiencing.

Everyone who is a caregiver tries his or her best to be supportive. Every patient who is undergoing this challenge is bound to be depressed and scared at times. Every family member may feel helpless most of the time.

This is the time to reach out and ask for guidance. Finding support groups is easier these days due to social media. Pemphigus Vulgaris is only one of 7,000 rare diseases that exist today and there are sources of information for each one of them. Search the Internet and contact local support groups. Check out the link given here for caregivers (It’s one of the very best!).

http://www.caregiveraction.org/

Rare Disease Day (RDD) is a unique global advocacy effort to bring recognition of rare diseases as an international health challenge.

On March 2, 2015, rare disease patients, caregivers and advocates, rare disease organization, legislators, and industry representatives gathered at the California State Capitol. Will Zrnchik, IPPF CEO, welcomed the crowd and introduced Peter Saltonstall, President and CEO of the National Organization for Rare Disorders. Peter said, “NORD has been working … to find a therapy, make sure the pathways are clear, and to make sure that the incentives are there for industry to want to develop drugs for small populations.” California Assembly Member Katcho Achadjian (D-36) co-sponsored CA House Resolution 6 recognizing February 28, 2015 as Rare Disease Day in California.

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Inside the Capitol, Andrea Vergne, rare disease caregiver and advocate, told her grandson’s story living with a rare disease. Gary Sherwood, Communication Directors at the National Alopecia Areata Foundation, inspired attendees to become self-advocates and work with their elected officials. Adding to the advocacy theme, Eve Bukowski, California Healthcare Institute, echoed the need for patients to self-advocate. A special guest, California State Senator Dr. Richard Pan discussed the importance of rare disease advocacy and research.

Meanwhile, Marc Yale, IPPF Senior Peer Health Coach, and Kate Frantz, Awareness Program Manager, celebrated RDD events in Washington, DC. Marc attended NORD’s special preview of the new documentary “Banner on the Moon.” Patients, caregivers, advocacy groups and patient organizations saw Cindy Abbott’s inspiring. Cindy carries a NORD banner with her on several adventures to spread rare disease awareness. These included challenging herself to climb Mount Everest and participating in the 1,000-mile Alaskan Iditarod. Cindy’s perseverance and commitment to live life to the fullest were very inspiring.

Kate and Marc attended the American Medical Student Association’s Annual Convention. Two P/P patients, Liz Starrels and Mimi Levich, shared their P/P stories. Many students had never heard of P/P, or only briefly remembered it from their textbooks. This was a wonderful opportunity to spread awareness and encourage medical students to “Put P/P on their Radar!”

RDD 2                           RDD

Marc represented the P/P community at the Rare Disease Legislative Advocates (RDLA) conference.  There was an overview of the 21st Century Cures Initiative (http://energycommerce.house.gov/cures), which many believe is the rare disease community’s greatest hope for new and emerging treatments.

Marc also met with several Congressional Members and legislative health experts encouraging their support of the Orphan Product Extensions Now Accelerating Cures and Treatment Act of 2015, H.R. 971. This legislation would re-purpose existing drugs for rare diseases allowing patients greater access to vital treatments.

Marc RDD                                        Marc RDD 2

Marc attended a symposium celebrating rare diseases research efforts across NIH, the Federal Government and the entire advocacy community.

There are over 7,000 rare diseases. 1 in 10 Americans are affected and 95% of these diseases have no approved treatment. Rare Disease Week and Rare Disease Day is an opportunity for the Pemphigus and Pemphigoid community to be heard by advocating for yourself and others.

If you have questions about current legislation or would like information on how you can become involved, please contact marc@pemphigus.org.

Results So Far

I had a follow-up appointment with Dr. Williams on July 17, 2014, one month after my first infusion and two weeks after the second. She looked at me and I swear her jaw dropped. She was amazed by how well I had responded. That was a fun appointment!

Jack Sherman 7

She had consulted Dr. Anhalt shortly before my treatment. Dr. Anhalt suggested going off of azathioprine a month after my second infusion (August 1), and to start a slow prednisone taper. I asked Dr. Williams if I should stop taking azathioprine now, two weeks before we were planning. We agreed I should stop taking it. One drug down!

Since then I haven’t taken azathioprine. Better yet, I’ve been on a continual prednisone taper. I started on 25 milligrams every other day. A week later, on July 23, 2014 (three weeks after my second infusion) I took these pictures. I was completely lesion free! I was ecstatic to say the least. This far exceeded my wildest dreams!

In January 2014 I am down to 2 milligrams of prednisone, every other day! This is the lowest dosage of prednisone I have ever been on. The best news is my skin is completely void of lesions. Sure I’ve had one or two minor ones, but nothing that doesn’t clear up quickly. Pretty amazing considering where I started.

I’m not claiming remission — yet! While it’s easy to be confident about my recovery, I prefer to say I’m very optimistic about my future living with pemphigus. What I have learned over the years about this disease is things can change pretty quickly. I could end up in total remission, or I could end up needing another round of Rituximab. Either way, I believe I will be better off than had I not opted for rituximab. For that I’m very grateful!

 Continued Support and Education

Each individual is just that, an individual. These diseases aren’t like more common diseases, like Type II Diabetes. If you go to 10 doctors after a diabetes diagnoses you will probably hear the same thing and expect the same results. With pemphigus and pemphigoid being rare, ultra orphan autoimmune diseases, your results and advice will likely vary.

Even though I’m a Peer Health Coach, Marc Yale has continued to be my coach. I can’t thank him enough for his time, knowledge and support he’s given me over the years. My goal is to help patients like Marc has helped me, and share this knowledge with them each and every day. Reach out to the IPPF and use its wealth of knowledge and patient resources. If you can attend the IPPF Patient Conference, I encourage you – I implore you – to go. The information and fellowship really does make a difference!

In the end, my biggest piece of advice to you is to be proactive in you care and treatment. Work with your physicians and create a team committed to your success. Share what you learn from your coach, attending a conference, or from a conference call with your doctor. Ask them to contact the IPPF who will connect them with a P/P expert. Whatever you do, it’s your health and quality of life at stake, so make informed, educated decisions. I did and couldn’t be happier!

Good luck, and good health to you all!

Part One
Part Two

Feb. 26, 2015 – SACRAMENTO, Calif. — Join rare disease patients, caregivers and other health care advocates in California on March 2, 2015 to raise important awareness for rare diseases as part of Rare Disease Day®.

During the event, patients and advocates will come together to articulate with one voice the shared message that millions of people around the world are suffering and need our help. Our patients need earlier diagnosis; safe, effective treatments; and assured access to medical care and other services.

Many important decisions related to rare diseases are made at the state level, including newborn screening; support services to help families cope with complex medical needs; an environment that promotes innovative medical research and product development; and insurance practices that assure patient access to medically-necessary therapies. The implementation of the Affordable Care Act has highlighted the increasingly important role of state policies and programs in assuring that the health care needs of Americans are addressed.

The event will be held on the North Steps of the Sacramento State Capitol at 10:00am. Speakers include Will Zrnchik, CEO, International Pemphigus & Pemphigoid Foundation, Peter Saltonstall, President and CEO, National Orginzation for Rare Disorders, and 2015 Rare Disease Day Resolution co-sponsor Assemblymember Katcho Achadjian. Immediately afterwards, people are encouraged to join speakers, patient advocacy organizations, and others to hear patient stories inside the Capitol, Conference Room #126.

The event is organized by patient advocates who have joined with the National Organization for Rare Disorders (NORD)®, a leading independent, non-profit organization committed to the identification, treatment, and cure of rare diseases, and national sponsor of Rare Disease Day in the U.S., to educate and inform the public, elected officials, legislative staff and the media.

According to the National Institutes of Health (NIH), a disease is rare if it affects fewer than 200,000 Americans. One in 10 Americans live with a rare disease—affecting 30 million people—and two-thirds of these patients are children. There are more than 7,000 rare diseases and only approximately 450 FDA-approved medical treatments. Many diseases are not being studied by medical researchers. Often, research gets funded by the families and friends of patients or by patient organizations.

Rare Disease Day is an annual awareness day celebrated around the world dedicated to elevating public understanding of rare diseases and calling attention to the special challenges faced by patients. Rare Disease Day takes place every year on the last day of February (February 28 or February 29 in a leap year)—the rarest date on the calendar—to underscore the nature of rare diseases and what patients face. It was established in Europe in 2008 by EURORDIS, the organization representing rare disease patients in Europe, and is now observed in more than 80 nations.

For more information about Rare Disease Day in the U.S., go to www.rarediseaseday.us. For information about global activities, visit www.rarediseaseday.org). To search for information about rare diseases, visit NORD’s website, www.rarediseases.org.

Time for the Infusion

As the treatment drew near, I had a lot of questions for Dr. Williams. She felt an oncologist was better equipped to answer them, so she scheduled a consult with one. That was a great move. The oncologist answered all my questions. He said prescribing and administering Rituxamab is an everyday occurrence for the infusion room. He said they give this treatment to leukemia and lymphoma patients who are in very poor health. Since I was in relatively good health, his concerns of complications for me were minimal. That was reassuring.

I had to do a lot of lab tests, which is common for intravenous treatments affecting the immune system. I was tested for several types of hepatitis, HIV, TB, and other infectious ailments. You can see from my “before” picture how bad my skin was.

I was treated using the Rheumatoid Arthritis Protocol (1,000 mg intravenously on days 1 and 15). My first dose was administered on June 17, 2014 and lasted 6 hours; the second on July 1, 2014, lasted 4 hours. I was relieved that other than a little jitteriness caused by a steroid drip, I had absolutely no side effects or reactions. It literally felt like I was getting a routine saline solution infusion.

Jack Sherman 4 Jack Sherman 3

When I went in for my second infusion, there was no change in my disease activity. I didn’t expect to see any changes for at least a month. To my surprise, as you can see by this photograph comparison, I was seeing signs of improvement a week after my second infusion! I was still taking 250 milligrams of azathioprine and 25 milligrams of prednisone every other day.

Jack Sherman 6 Jack Sherman 5

Stay tuned for next week’s conclusion of Jack Sherman’s Road to Rituximab Story…

Part One
Part Three