Tag Archives: IV

Time for the Infusion

As the treatment drew near, I had a lot of questions for Dr. Williams. She felt an oncologist was better equipped to answer them, so she scheduled a consult with one. That was a great move. The oncologist answered all my questions. He said prescribing and administering Rituxamab is an everyday occurrence for the infusion room. He said they give this treatment to leukemia and lymphoma patients who are in very poor health. Since I was in relatively good health, his concerns of complications for me were minimal. That was reassuring.

I had to do a lot of lab tests, which is common for intravenous treatments affecting the immune system. I was tested for several types of hepatitis, HIV, TB, and other infectious ailments. You can see from my “before” picture how bad my skin was.

I was treated using the Rheumatoid Arthritis Protocol (1,000 mg intravenously on days 1 and 15). My first dose was administered on June 17, 2014 and lasted 6 hours; the second on July 1, 2014, lasted 4 hours. I was relieved that other than a little jitteriness caused by a steroid drip, I had absolutely no side effects or reactions. It literally felt like I was getting a routine saline solution infusion.

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When I went in for my second infusion, there was no change in my disease activity. I didn’t expect to see any changes for at least a month. To my surprise, as you can see by this photograph comparison, I was seeing signs of improvement a week after my second infusion! I was still taking 250 milligrams of azathioprine and 25 milligrams of prednisone every other day.

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Stay tuned for next week’s conclusion of Jack Sherman’s Road to Rituximab Story…

Part One
Part Three