Tag Archives: Marc Yale

More people have climbed Mount Everest than have crossed the United States of America on foot. Noah Coughlan has just finished with his amazing third run across america. Noah started a coast-to-coast run February 28, 2015 in New York City, NY. He finished after 127 days, crossing 13 states, and running 3,000 miles. He was greeted by his family, friends, and hundreds of patients with rare diseases, as he ran into the water at Ocean Beach, California on the 4th of July 2015.

Finale Finish Line Flag Done

Noah had been running to rally support for the 30 million Americans affected by rare diseases. There are over 7,000 known rare diseases – affecting 1 out of every 10 Americans. Noah’s inspiration to run comes from his personal connection to two childhood friends battling a rare brain disease called Batten Disease. Noah’s efforts demonstrated that just one person can truly make a difference. During his “Run4Rare” he was interviewed by many media outlets, met with lawmakers, engaged patients and families, and rallied support for the scientists and researchers attempting to find cures for rare diseases.

Throughout his journey Noah dedicated his daily miles to a different child or adult battling a different rare disease. On May 29, 2016 he dedicated his run to Marc Yale and the entire pemphigus and pemphigoid community. He ran an average of 25 miles per day battling adverse weather conditions and physical exhaustion. Noah ran solo while pushing an 80 pound jogging stroller of supplies. Above his stroller waved a large American flag given to him by the United States Air Force. The American flag Noah ran with every day was officially retired in a moving ceremony at Ocean Beach, CA when he arrived on Independence Day.

Noah’s unwavering dedication to be the voice for the rare disease community by running across the U.S. three times was inspiring to many advocates. One patient stated at a reception, sponsored by the National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD), following the transcontinental run, “that he created a bridge for all rare disease groups to work together.” The impact that Noah delivered during his “Run4Rare” was to show that every person matters. Noah’s message of hope for patients with rare diseases has reached the halls of congress and every community he passed through on his journey.  His passion and tenacity as an advocate should remind us all that we need to advocate for ourselves as well as the entire rare disease community.

Noah and Marc Hannah and Noah Marc, Woman, and Noah Noah

Dear pemphigus & pemphigoid community,

The House of Representatives is expected to vote on H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act, the week of June 15th. The IPPF is urging our patient community to show its united support for this crucial legislation by contacting your representative today and ask them to co-sponsor H.R. 6, the 21st Century Cures Act.

This bill includes many provisions that could benefit our community and the rare disease community as whole including:

  • Billions in funding for the National Institutes of Health (NIH)
  • Hundreds of millions dollars in new funding for the Food & Drug Administration (FDA)
  • The OPEN ACT, which contains incentives that could double the number of rare disease treatments
  • The CURE ACT, that requires companies to publish expanded access policies
  • Patient focused drug development
  • It’s easy. Don’t wait! Go to this link to make your voice heard: http://www.congressweb.com/KAKI/39

For those not familiar with an action alert here are some simple instructions:
1. Click on the link above
2. Fill in your street address & zip code and click “take action”
3. Fill in the rest of your personal information and a personal message (optional) about what 21st Century Cures means to you
4. Review your message and click “send”

For more information on 21st Century Cures you can go to: http://energycommerce.house.gov/cures

For questions or if you are interested in getting involved in advocacy for the pemphigus & pemphigoid community, please contact Marc Yale marc@pemphigus.org