Tag Archives: pemphigus foliaceus

While you are seeing a qualified dermatologist who is treating you for your Pemphigus Vulgaris, Bullous Pemphigoid, Pemphigus Foliaceus, Mucous Membrane Pemphigoid, etc. you might also be seeing your own dentist, OB/GYN, internist, ophthalmologist or ear/nose/throat specialist.

Please be sure that all of your doctors are aware of your condition and that they have access to your dermatologist.  It is important that they know the medications and dosage that you are taking for each medication.

All of your doctors need to be able to communicate with one another if necessary.  Being left in the dark will leave you at a disadvantage.  Also, if you are going to be scheduled for any major dental work, advise your dermatologist.  Depending on the procedure, your medications may be adjusted for a few days prior and a few days following to prevent any flare-ups.

Remember when you need us we are in your corner!

Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is the most common autoimmune skin disease of dogs and other animal species. Although PF can spontaneously affect dogs of any breed, it appears more prevalent in Akita Inus and chow chows in the United States. The primary lesions are large pustules which rupture easily and progress rapidly to erosions and crusts. Lesion distribution most often involves the face, nasal planum, and ears. One third of affected dogs have paw pad lesions. Skin lesions of PF can remain localized or involve the entire body. The diagnosis of PF in dogs is based on historical information, clinical signs,

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and the demonstration of acantholytic keratinocytes in vesicles or pustules. (Source: Advances in Small Animal Medicine and Surgery)

Article can be purchased from : http://www.advancesinsmallanimal.com/article/PIIS1041782612000230/abstract?rss=yes

american-quarter-horsePemphigus foliaceus (pem-fi-gus foli-a-shus) is an auto immune disease that affects humans and dogs and, to a lesser extent, cats and horses.
In horses, it is characterized by primary lesions that often begin on the head and lower extremities; secondary lesions spread to other areas, with an exudate that dries to a crust. There may be extensive edema (swelling) in the legs and abdomen (called “ventral” edema).
Equine pemphigus foliaceus (EPF) is considered rare and signs and symptoms may resemble those of other conditions such as insect bite allergies (crusty lesions), pigeon fever (ventral edema) or other skin conditions.
The primary way to diagnose EPF is by punch biopsy of the skin which is examined by a veterinary pathologist. The pathologist looks for changes consistent with this diagnosis, while also ruling out other causes.
Horses with EPF may also have systemic signs of illness – fever, depression, loss of appetite, lethargy and weight loss. The skin may be painful to touch and swelling can make it difficult to walk or lie down.

Screenshot_2Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is an immune-mediated disease that causes pustules and crusted lesions, most commonly on the pinnae, nasal planum, periocular area, chin, feet of affected cats. Acantholytic cells caused by dehydration of intercellular adhesions are often seen on cytology but are not pathognomic for PF. A definitive diagnosis is made based on histopathology showing subcorneal pustules with nondegenerate neutrophils and acantholytic cells. PF is treated with immunosuppressive doses of corticosteroids alone or in combination with other immunosuppresive medications, such as chlorambucil or cyclosporine. Most patients require lifelong treatment with these medications to keep the disease in remission.

Hershey, a 6-year-old, spayed domestic shorthaired cat weighing 3.4 kg, presented with an acute onset of nonpruritic crusted lesions on the head, ears, nail beds, and nasal area. She had a 2-day history of lethargy and anorexia. She had no history of medical disease and was up-to-date on vaccinations.

Full article on: http://mobile.vetlearn.com/Media/images/pdf/2010/PV/PV0510_mckay_Derm.pdf

Context.-Pemphigus is a group of autoimmune vesiculobullous diseases characterized by immunoglobulin G (IgG) antibodies directed against desmosomal adhesion proteins, with IgG4 being the predominant subclass in active diseases. Direct immunofluorescence for IgG performed on fresh-frozen tissue plays a crucial role in diagnosing pemphigus. However, the diagnosis might be hindered when frozen tissue is not available. Objective.-To evaluate the usefulness of immunohistochemistry for IgG4 performed on paraffin sections as a diagnostic test for pemphigus. Design.-Eighteen immunofluorescence-proven pemphigus cases (12 pemphigus vulgaris, 6 pemphigus foliaceus) were studied. Four normal skin specimens and 32 nonpemphigus vesiculobullous disease specimens served as controls. Paraffin sections of all cases were examined immunohistochemically for IgG4 expression. Positivity was defined as distinct, condensed, continuous immunoreactivity localized to the intercellular junctions of keratinocytes. Results.-The immunostains were independently evaluated in a masked manner by 3 pathologists, with a 100% interobserver agreement. Nine of 12 pemphigus vulgaris cases (sensitivity 75.0%), and 4 of 6 pemphigus foliaceus cases (sensitivity 66.7%), were positive for IgG4 immunostain. The overall sensitivity was 72.2%. One control specimen (bullous pemphigoid) showed IgG4 positivity (specificity 97.2%). In specimens demonstrating acantholysis, 8 of 10 pemphigus vulgaris cases (sensitivity 80.0%) and 4 of 4 pemphigus foliaceus cases (sensitivity 100.0%) were positive for IgG4. The overall sensitivity for specimens with acantholytic lesions was 85.7%. Conclusion.-Immunohistochemistry for IgG4 provides a reasonably sensitive and highly specific test for diagnosing pemphigus, especially when frozen tissue is not available, and active acantholytic lesions are examined.

Full article available at: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23106586?dopt=Abstract

A 14-year-old male presented with seven years history of recurrent episodes of fluid filled, itchy and eroded lesions over the body not responding to oral corticosteroids and azathioprine. Dermatological examination revealed crusted plaques and erosions in a seborrheic distribution. Histopathology of skin lesions and direct immunofluorescence were characteristic of pemphigus foliaceus. He was treated with dexamethasone pulse therapy with inadequate response. However, relapsing skin lesions revealed a circinate arrangement with a predilection to trunk and flexures. In view of clinical features suggestive of IgA pemphigus, he was started on dapsone, to which he responded dramatically in four weeks. However, repeat biopsy continued to reveal features of pemphigus foliaceus and ELISA for anti- desmoglein 1 antibodies was positive.

Background.  Pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF) are autoimmune vesicobullous disorders with IgG autoantibodies directed against desmoglein (Dsg)1 and 3, which lead to intraepidermal acantholysis.

Aim.  To characterize the clinical and immunological profile of patients with PF or PV with umbilical involvement.

Methods.  In total, 10 patients (7 women, 3 men; age range 24–70 years, disease duration 3–16 years) diagnosed with either PV (n = 5) or mucocutaneous PF (n = 5) were assessed according to their clinical features, histopathology and immunological findings .

Results.  Erythema, erosions, crusts and vegetating skin lesions were the main clinical features of the umbilical region. DIF of the umbilical region gave positive results for intercellular epidermal IgG and C3 deposits in eight patients and for IgG alone in the other two. Indirect immunofluorescence with IgG conjugate showing the typical pemphigus pattern was positive in all 10 patients, with titres varying from 1 : 160 to 1 : 2560. ELISA with recombinant Dsg1 gave scores of 24–266 in PF and 0–270 in PV. Reactivity to recombinant Dsg3 was positive in all five patients with PV (ELISA 22–98) and was negative in all PF sera.

Conclusions.  All 10 patients with pemphigus with umbilical presentation had the clinical and immunopathological features of either PF or PV. This peculiar presentation, not yet completely elucidated, has rarely been reported in the literature. A possible explanation for this unique presentation may be the presence of either novel epitopes or an association with embryonic or scar tissue located in the umbilical-cord region.

Full article available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2230.2012.04468.x/abstract

Pemphigus is a chronic, muco-cutaneous autoimmune blistering disorder; two main variants being pemphigus vulgaris (PV) and pemphigus foliaceus (PF). PV is the most common subtype, varying between 75 to 92% of total pemphigus patients. Although no community based studies are undertaken to estimate the incidence of pemphigus in India, it is relatively common. A questionnaire based survey in Thrissur district of south India estimated pemphigus incidence to be 4.4 per million population. Mortality due to pemphigus has decreased remarkably with the aggressive and widespread use of corticosteroids, prior to which it was as high as 90%. High dose corticosteroids were once used in combination with other immunosuppressants with good improvement, but such high doses of corticosteroids were often associated with severe side effects, and were responsible for the death of nearly 10% of the patients. With the aim of reducing the adverse effects of long term, high dose steroid administration dexamethasone cyclophosphamide pulse (DCP) therapy was introduced in 1984. Since then DCP or oral corticosteroids with or without adjuvant immunosuppressants (azathioprine, cyclophosphamide, mycophenolatemofetil, and cyclosporine) have been the corner-stone of therapy for these disorders in India. Despite the benefits associated with DCP therapy compared to high dose oral steroids, it cannot be denied that even DCP therapy with or without adjuvants can lead to numerous adverse events, which account for majority of deaths in pemphigus. Moreover there are few patients who fail to improve with these conventional treatments or have contraindications for their usage. Thus there has been a constant search for newer therapeutic modalities in pemphigus. Rituximab (Reditux. Dr. Reddy’s, Hyderabad, India and MabThera TM , Roche, Basel, Switzerland), a monoclonal chimeric IgG1 antibody targeting the B cell specific cell-surface antigen CD20, is one such newer novel therapy for pemphigus (an off-label indication for its use. It has so far been approved by FDA for use only in CD 20+ B cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, treatment resistant rheumatoid arthritis, Wegener’s granulomatosis and microscopic polyangiitis).

There is currently no consensus on the optimal dosage and schedule of rituximab in treatment of pemphigus. The various treatment protocols followed include:

  1. Lymphoma protocol- Most commonly followed protocol. Rituximab is administered at a dose of 375mg/m 2 body surface area weekly for four weeks.
  2. Rheumatoid arthritis protocol- Two doses of rituximab 1g is administered at an interval of 15 days. Increasingly used by dermatologists and is the protocol currently followed in our institute. Advantage over the lymphoma protocol include less cost and fewer infusions.
  3. Combination therapy- Rituximab has been used in combination with IVIG, immunoadsorption and dexamethasone pulse therapy
  4. Long-term rituximab treatment with regular infusions every 4 or 12 weeks following an induction cycle of infusions every week

Full article can be viewed at: http://www.ijdvl.com/article.asp?issn=0378-6323;year=2012;volume=78;issue=6;spage=671;epage=676;aulast=Kanwar

Pemphigus foliaceus, the most common autoimmune skin condition in dogs and cats, is characterized by pustules, erosions, and crusts. In this article, we focus on the diagnosis and treatment of pemphigus foliaceus in dogs and cats.

The signs of an attack on keratinocyte adhesion structures are clinically evident. When the tight bonds between superficial keratinocytes are affected, it manifests as vesicles and pustules. When the tight bonds between basilar keratinocytes and the skin’s basement membrane are affected, it manifests as bullae (large blisters) and ulcers.

In pemphigus foliaceus in people, the most common target of autoantibodies is the desmoglein 1 (DSG1) glycoprotein in the desmosome. The autoantibody response primarily involves IgG (IgG4 subclass). Initial studies in dogs with pemphigus foliaceus only rarely detected an IgG autoantibody response, but more recent work using different substrates in indirect immunofluorescence testing confirms that IgG autoantibodies are important in canine pemphigus foliaceus. However, DSG1 is not commonly targeted in pemphigus foliaceus in dogs ; it is not yet known which part of the desmosome is targeted in most canine pemphigus foliaceus cases. Early immunoblotting studies revealed that the target was a 148 kDa or 160 kDa protein. Immunoelectron microscopy shows that the site of autoantibody binding is in the extracellular region of the desmosome.

Genetic factors can influence the development of pemphigus foliaceus. In dogs, it is more frequently diagnosed in two breeds with closely related genotypes, Akitas and chows. Pemphigus foliaceus has also been reported in littermates. No breed disposition has been noted in feline pemphigus foliaceus. Sex and age appear to be unrelated to the development of pemphigus foliaceus in dogs and cats. The age of onset is variable and ranges from 1 to 16 years in dogs and less than 1 year of age4 to up to 17 years of age in cats.

Background  Pemphigus foliaceus (PF) is a chronic cutaneous autoimmune blistering

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disease that is characterized by superficial blistering of the skin, and according to the current perspective is caused by autoantibodies directed against desmoglein (Dsg) 1.

Objectives  To examine early acantholysis in the skin of patients with PF at an ultrastructural level.

Methods  Two Nikolsky-negative (N−), five Nikolsky-positive (N+) and two lesional skin biopsies from immunoserologically defined patients with PF were studied by light and electron microscopy.

Results  We found no abnormalities in N− PF skin, whereas all the N+ skin biopsies displayed intercellular widening between desmosomes, a decreased number of desmosomes and hypoplastic desmosomes in the lower epidermal layers. Acantholysis was present in two of five N+ biopsies, but only in the upper epidermal layers. The lesional skin biopsies displayed acantholysis in the higher epidermal layers. Hypoplastic desmosomes were partially (pseudo-half-desmosomes) or completely torn off from the opposing cell.

Conclusion  We propose the following mechanism for acantholysis in PF: initially PF IgG causes a depletion of nonjunctional Dsg1, leading to intercellular widening between desmosomes starting in the lower layers and spreading upwards. Depletion of nonjunctional Dsg1 impairs the assembly of desmosomes, resulting in hypoplastic desmosomes and a decreased number of desmosomes. In addition, antibodies might promote disassembly of desmosomes. In the upper layers of the epidermis, where Dsg3 is not expressed and cannot compensate for Dsg1 loss, ongoing depletion of Dsg1 will finally result in a total disappearance of desmosomes and subsequent acantholysis.

Full article available at: http://onlinelibrary.wiley.com/doi/10.1111/j.1365-2133.2012.11173.x/abstract;jsessionid=624E75DA95767387AA80E95C275F4100.d02t01