Tag Archives: rare disease

For pemphigus and pemphigoid patients, there are several events that can trigger stress and exacerbate disease activity, even simply being diagnosed with a rare disease. The time it takes to be diagnosed, the medication itself, and how it all affects our families and friends can trigger stress and depression.

Although there has been a huge public outcry over the cost of prescription drugs, there has been little public discussion about the need for innovation for patients who don’t yet have an effective therapy. It is estimated that 1 in 10 Americans suffer from a rare disease, and only 5% of rare diseases have a treatment approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA).

In November 2014, I used the chemotherapy drug Rituxan off-label for my rare disease, Immune Thrombocytopenia (ITP). The decision was made after careful consideration of all the possible outcomes. I was desperate for relief since ITP causes internal bleeding that can be fatal. This thought stayed in the back of my mind as I watched my platelets drop and my bleeding episodes increase in severity.

The IPPF strives to do many things for the pemphigus and pemphigoid community, but our three biggest goals are to raise awareness, create a support network, and to increase education. One of the biggest tools that we have at our disposal to accomplish those goals is social media.

More people have climbed Mount Everest than have crossed the United States of America on foot. Noah Coughlan has just finished with his amazing third run across america. Noah started a coast-to-coast run February 28, 2015 in New York City, NY. He finished after 127 days, crossing 13 states, and running 3,000 miles. He was greeted by his family, friends, and hundreds of patients with rare diseases, as he ran into the water at Ocean Beach, California on the 4th of July 2015.

Finale Finish Line Flag Done

Noah had been running to rally support for the 30 million Americans affected by rare diseases. There are over 7,000 known rare diseases – affecting 1 out of every 10 Americans. Noah’s inspiration to run comes from his personal connection to two childhood friends battling a rare brain disease called Batten Disease. Noah’s efforts demonstrated that just one person can truly make a difference. During his “Run4Rare” he was interviewed by many media outlets, met with lawmakers, engaged patients and families, and rallied support for the scientists and researchers attempting to find cures for rare diseases.

Throughout his journey Noah dedicated his daily miles to a different child or adult battling a different rare disease. On May 29, 2016 he dedicated his run to Marc Yale and the entire pemphigus and pemphigoid community. He ran an average of 25 miles per day battling adverse weather conditions and physical exhaustion. Noah ran solo while pushing an 80 pound jogging stroller of supplies. Above his stroller waved a large American flag given to him by the United States Air Force. The American flag Noah ran with every day was officially retired in a moving ceremony at Ocean Beach, CA when he arrived on Independence Day.

Noah’s unwavering dedication to be the voice for the rare disease community by running across the U.S. three times was inspiring to many advocates. One patient stated at a reception, sponsored by the National Organization of Rare Disorders (NORD), following the transcontinental run, “that he created a bridge for all rare disease groups to work together.” The impact that Noah delivered during his “Run4Rare” was to show that every person matters. Noah’s message of hope for patients with rare diseases has reached the halls of congress and every community he passed through on his journey.  His passion and tenacity as an advocate should remind us all that we need to advocate for ourselves as well as the entire rare disease community.

Noah and Marc Hannah and Noah Marc, Woman, and Noah Noah